Critique 009 – It’s All In The Eyes

Critique 009 – It’s All In The Eyes Another four images under the loupe (well, on the screen anyway). Two studio portraits, two out on location – plenty to enjoy! If you would like your images critiqued, please use the Image Critique menu option above to submit a file (or more than one of you wish). Your image will then …

Image Critique 013

Another four images to enjoy, another four authors who have submitted their work. We create these critiques to try and help portrait photographers with different viewpoints and ideas. Some you’ll agree with, some you won’t (of course) but watch it through and let us know what you think! If you would like your images critiqued, JOIN NOW to view this …

Creating Stunning Portraits With Rotolight AEOS and NEO2

The good folk at Rotolight lent us two pieces of kit for this demo: the Rotolight AEOS and the NEO 2. These lights were originally designed for video work, but Rotolight have added a strobe feature that means they can be used like studio flash lights or location strobes (off-camera flash). They are extremely lightweight, very portable and their battery …

Video: Studio Lighting For Available-Light Photographers

Perhaps you’re fairly (or very) comfortable with window-lit portraiture, but feel a little intimated by the idea of studio strobes. If so, you’re definitely not alone! For a very long time, I struggled to understand all the technical detail that seemed to be a necessary requirement for getting started with studio lighting, especially as I just wanted to get back to …

Using Your Subject’s Natural Stance

People need direction in front of the camera – otherwise they often become self-conscious and suddenly forget how they would sit or stand in a relaxed manner normally. So how do I pose them without making them look all… posed? Glen got in contact with us because he wanted some portraits to give to his nan. He has quite a …

Blue-Eyed Boy

A simple, one-light set-up, a narrow colour palette and a bit of silliness (to catch your subject’s eye) are all that you need for a child’s portrait like this one. While parents usually want to have pictures of their children looking happy, sometimes it’s the more serious expressions that capture the true nature of their sons and daughters. This youngster, …