Foundations: Portable Flash Your Mobile Studio

Entry- and enthusiast-level DSLRs usually include an on-camera flash which pops up on demand or when using auto mode and shooting in low light conditions. Out of necessity, the flash is physically positioned only a few centimetres away from the lens, which causes a few problems, including ‘red eye’ and harsh, flat lighting. The flash emitted typically overpowers the ambient light, resulting in your subject looking like a rabbit caught in a car’s headlights. In addition, any reflective surfaces in …

Foundations: Studio Lighting And Modifiers

Photography isn’t a cheap pursuit and it’s all too easy to spend a huge amount of money on equipment, but a lot of it will end up being unused unless you buy it for a specific purpose. Before getting out your wallet, think about what you want to achieve with the kit, and only buy what you will definitely need to get started with – you can always add to it later. If you’re going to set up a permanent …

Foundations: Accessories For Portrait Photographers

Once you’ve got your camera and lens choice sorted, there are optional accessories to consider. In addition, if you are shooting professionally, you need to consider having spares of your entire kit. Although this may seem like an unreasonable additional outlay, cameras, lenses and supplementary kit can occasionally fail, and if you are photographing portraits that can’t easily be re-shot, then you could be risking your professional reputation if you don’t have back-ups. In addition, you can have different lenses …

Foundations: Choosing A Lens

Your images will only ever be as good as the glass you use, so don’t blow all your budget on an amazing camera body and end up with a cheap or kit lens. Professional photographers tend to upgrade their camera body every 2-5 years, but top quality lenses can last much, much longer, so consider them a long-term investment: cameras wear out, but lenses don’t. Lenses that are included with entry-evel and mid-range camera bodies tend to be lower quality, …

Foundations: Choosing Your Camera

Obviously you won’t get far in photography without having the necessary kit – but which type of camera is best for portrait photography? There’s more to it than just having a high count of megapixels – unless you’re printing out huge enlargements of an image to go on the wall, a lot of the pixel detail will go to waste anyway. Instead, look for sensor size, lens quality and the ability to have full control over the camera’s settings. Once …